Some Storyboards for “The Night I appeared as Macbeth”

Here are storyboards for William Hargreaves’ song “the night I appeared as Macbeth”

The pictures are not absolutely in the intended order

campaign 1546campaign 1547

The band played the barber of seville quite a lot before I came oncampaign 1548campaign 1549campaign 1550campaign 1551

cos we cut quite a few pages whenever rehearsal went wrongcampaign 1552campaign 1553campaign 1554campaign 1555campaign 1556campaign 1557campaign 1558campaign 1559

oh the flowers, what a feast. they threw it in bagfulls self raising and yeastcampaign 1593campaign 1594campaign 1595campaign 1596campaign 1597campaign 1598campaign 1599campaign 1600campaign 1601campaign 1602campaign 1603campaign 1604campaign 1605campaign 1606

campaign 1607campaign 1588campaign 1589campaign 1590campaign 1591campaign 1592

Dance:campaign 1587campaign 1586campaign 1584campaign 1585campaign 1583campaign 1580campaign 1581

so I put in some lines from some popular rhymes, and some well-chosen words of my owncampaign 1582campaign 1578campaign 1577

I improved the part with a dance
campaign 1576campaign 1581campaign 1579campaign 1580campaign 1573

They threw it self-raising and yeast!

campaign 1572campaign 1571

campaign 1570campaign 1568campaign 1566campaign 1565campaign 1564

campaign 1563

campaign 1562

campaign 1561

campaign 1560

Here is a version of the song performed by Tim:

Current Showreel

Here is a version of the current showreel:

 

with some additional imagery from “How pleasant to know Mr Lear”

showreel1a.jpg

how pleasant 1

 

showreel a

From BBC 4

showreel b Tim Wilson

From A History of the Music Hall, Part 2. (Part 1 here:

showreel c tim wilson

From Juststeve: Μία Ζωή Στα Χέρια Σου | Mia Zoi Sta Heria Soy

showreel d tim wilson

From a film about the Odyssey (Zontul)

showreel e tim wilson

From Wasteworld, dir Andrea Niada

showreel f tim wilson

From A history of the Music Hall, Part 2

showreel g tim wilson.jpg

Jumblies (Zontul)

showreel h tim wilson.jpg

Captain Cod (Better off Out campaign)

showreel i tim wilson

Aubade- titles for a film about a guitar: dir Henry Astor.

showreel j tim wilson.jpg

Marie Lloyd from “A History of the Music Halls, part 2 by Tim Wilson” (Zontul)

showreel k tim wilson

Introduction/ overture to “Trial by Jury” in development (Zontul. Music David Watson, Kanon editions) Gilbert and Sullivan

showreel l tim wilson.jpg

Red is the colour of life: charity campaign and TV series in Turkey (Title sequence)

showreel m tim wilson

Burlington Bertie (Animation & Voice Tim, music David Watson/ kanon editions)

showreel n tim wilson.jpg

“Torture Cartoon” sponsored by Screen south, dir photography Richard Hering, animation by Tim. (Zontul)

showreel o tim wilson.jpg

Bread father- Darende a personal history

showreel p tim wilson.jpg

How to be Boss, What Plato says – Best animation 2012 (Reed) Animation by Tim, Music Juststeve.

showreel q tim wilson

How to write a good essay – by Professor Tim Wilson (Zontul) animation and presentation

 

showreel x tim wilson

Better off Out campaign 2016 – Betty Brexit

 

showreel s tim wilson.jpg

From British History’s Biggest Fibs Episode 3 (17 animated sequences throughout the series and titles by Tim) Produicer: Nick Gillam Smith, presented by Lucy Worsley for BBC4

showreel t showreel.jpg

From British History’s Biggest Fibs, part 1 (Richard III) 6 animated sequences by Tim

showreel u tim wilson.jpg

Episode 2: British History’s biggest Fibs (5 sequences animated by Tim)

showreel v.jpg

Matilda sequence from “A history of the British Music Hall part 2” (animated by Tim, cel- painting by Necati Zontul), music by Kanon editions

showreel w tim wilson.jpg

The Judge’s song from “Trial by Jury” (Zontul) by Gilbert and Sullivan (In development)

Trial by Jury corresponding original storyboard.jpg

Storyboard from Trial by Jury showing original blocking for the scene

how pleasant to know Mr lear6

How Pleasant to Know Mr Lear (vocals: Thomasin Tresize, music David Watson, Kanon editions, other storyboards: the night I appeared as Macbeth, vocals Tim Wilson, arr David Watson.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matilda and saucy postcards

5-tim-copy-of-mcgillA sequence I am working on at the moment (Matilda by Harry Champion*) to complete the two music halls films draws inspiration form the work of Donald McGill.

6-tim-copy-of-mcgill-postcard

Just after the war, about 1300 subversive picture postcards, redolent in double-entendres, were seized by the police and a court case was held to judge whether these cards were undermining public morality. Oddly, it is exactly the same sort of humour that turns up on screen a few years’ later in the “carry on films”. They got away with it. The postcard industry was not so fortunate. The line taken by the postcard artists in court, however, was that the pictures were only offensive to those people corrupt enough to appreciate the risqué jokes. Quite a brilliant bit of legal subterfuge in itself.

mcgill-3-by-tim

The king of the seaside postcard was Donald McGill. I have spent many months copying his images and my moleskin is stuffed with them! It is only when you look at what an artist does very carefully that you appreciate the cleverness of composition and the recurring features. Donald McGill is really a very good draughtsman! What I love perhaps more than the expressions which are excellent and well-observed are the ways he breaks the frame- constantly!

4-mcgill-copy-by-tim

His images are just the flip-side of the Dandy and the Beano. The adult-version. His men are whimpy, his women rubenesque. Here are my copies of some pictures by other postcard illustrators – the first one is clearly Edwardian so there is some history to this…

mcgill-by-tim-2

1-mcgill-by-tim

 

*Really interesting lyric which I have avoided:

“Matilda she went to a fancy dress ball and she played an original part.
She rubbed herself over with raspberry jam and she went as a raspberry tart.
I went up to hug her and give her a kiss. Well, the jam was all over my kite.
I know she’s a sticker, but lor’ what a licker! I shouted, “You’ve done it tonight.”

The kite in this case would be his belly as in the expression “stuff my kite”. The expression is also in the other song “Boiled beef and carrots”- ‘From morn till night, Blow out your kite on Boiled Beef and Carrots’

“Played an original part”, which I have retained, is a great line with the suggestion that Matilda was not only dressed as something unusual but that she was being a bit rude too.

In rhyming slang “a raspberry tart” is flatulence.

“discovered that I was a jay” – in 1880, this generally meant a fool and is retained in the US in the word “jaywalker”

“the dicky”- slang for shirt.

Ola Kala

While there is a fairly good account of the introduction of the expression OK into the UK in the song “Walking in the Zoo” sung by Alfred Vance, the Great Vance, one of the great “lions comiques”, it probably emerged from the Greek migrant population in Boston or New York and is first recorded in use in 1839.

thegreatvance

The sheet music here is decorated with a drawing by Richard Childs and dates from 1871.

sakis

Sakis Rouvas (whose birthday is tomorrow) popularised the term “Ola Kala” in a Greek pop song written by the American songwriter, Desmond Child in 2002. Child also wrote “she bangs” and “La vida Lorca” for Ricky Martin.

Illustrated history of the Music hall

Here is a link to the first part of my talk on the history of the Music hall.

history bertie2 flat

\

and here is a link to Julie Andrews singing the National Anthem for the King at the Palladium:

Here incidentally is a recording of Dame Julie at 12 singing, at the height of her “Educating Archie” days – simply spectacular

and here are some of the illustrations from the film:

dan_leno chicago vesta in dress arthur_lloyd Vesta_Tilleyagain1 Sims_Reeves vesta Bessie Bonehill KingHetty

fe smithDiana_Cooper01thanks for the memorypaul-chinquevallimarie linnet3vesta in dressarthur_lloydVesta_Tilleyagain1punch copy 4julie andrewsSir_Edmund_Backhousecasementfe smith solicitorgeneraethel-le-neveFrederickEdwinSmithHhcrippenpunch copy 3punch copy 2punch copymarie lloyd more3lady de freceleslieLittle_Tich fanny-andstella Fanny_and_Stella_again

Here’s a scene from the Drury Lane production of “Oliver!” which sums up everything about the Music Hall, I suppose.